Top 10 facts about Grim’s Dyke

Samantha PillingHistory, Latest News

Grim’s Dyke Hotel

Originally a country home, Grim’s Dyke has a wide and varied history, not only because of who owned the property over the years, but for who built it and what it subsequently became in later life. It’s one of the few country houses that survived war, recession and demolition – so it’s only fair that we honour that achievement, by … Read More

Victorian Women and Their Hobbies

Samantha PillingHistory

Victorian Women

Victorian women were expected to run the house, manage the servants, be the best possible hostess and raise the children. For the middle-class Victorian woman however, there was also plenty of time free for hobbies and entertainment. Like many Victorian middle-class ladies, Lady Gilbert loved gardening. She designed the 30 acres of ornamental gardens within the grounds of Grim’s Dyke … Read More

Nancy McIntosh: W.S. Gilbert’s unofficially adopted daughter

Samantha PillingHistory

Sunken Garden

Sir William and Lady Lucy Gilbert never had children of their own however they took a shine to Sir William’s latest (and last) protégée, Nancy McIntosh. Nancy became their unofficially adopted daughter, living with them at Grim’s Dyke until Lady Gilbert’s death in 1936. Nancy McIntosh was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1866. Her career as a concert singer began with … Read More

Grim’s Dyke: A house of many influences

Samantha PillingHistory, The Gardens

Grims Dyke

Built in 1870, Grims Dyke was designed by Richard Norman Shaw. Shaw was renowned for blending old and new styles of architecture and Grims Dyke was a testament to this. The design and subsequent build of Grims Dyke, successfully proved his theory that old English architecture was compatible with modern ideas of comfort and style. Grims Dyke was created in … Read More

W.S. Gilbert – a man of principles and passions

Samantha PillingLatest News

WS Gilbert

W.S. Gilbert was often portrayed as a gruff, prickly, disagreeable man, something he was quick to play up to, however this wasn’t always accurate. He didn’t suffer fools easily and often spoke his mind, making him confrontational –something that lost him several friendships and often caused rifts between himself and Sullivan. But Gilbert was a man of principle and he could … Read More

The Garrick Theatre – W.S. Gilbert’s legacy

Samantha PillingHistory

Garrick Theatre

The Garrick Theatre first opened its doors on 24th April 1889, with an Arthur Wing Pinero play, The Profiligate. Situated on Charing Cross Road, The Garrick was renowned English librettist, dramatist, poet and illustrator W.S. Gilbert’s legacy (as financier for the theatre’s build). Designed by Walter Emden, the theatre nearly didn’t happen, after difficult site planning, due to an underground river being discovered … Read More

W.S. Gilbert – a leading figure for theatrical reform

Samantha PillingHistory

theatrical reform

Drawing of Priscilla German Reed in both the parts she played in an 1857 double bill: the title roles in The Flower-boy and The Scotch Fisher-girl In the 1870’s the theatres of London were full of sexually orientated burlesque shows and badly adapted French operettas. Theatre had fallen into disrepute and wasn’t seen as a suitable place for any underage … Read More

The Savoy Theatre – home of Gilbert & Sullivan

Samantha PillingEntertainment, History

Savoy Theatre

Built by Richard D’Oyly Carte, the Savoy Theatre opened on 10th October 1881. Originally, the theatre was going to be called the ‘Beaufort Theatre’, but Carte chose to honour the original Savoy Manor theatre, previously on the site. The Savoy Theatre was purpose-built as the showcase for Gilbert & Sullivan comic operas and the partnership subsequently becoming known as the ‘Savoy Operas’. Plans afoot Although … Read More

The cultural influences of Gilbert & Sullivan

Samantha PillingEntertainment, History

muppets

Gilbert & Sullivan were well-known for their comedy operas, with the likes of ‘Pirates of Penzance’ and ‘Iolanthe’. They appealed to the audiences of their time, due in part, to the successful partnership of Gilbert’s lyrical genius & the musical composition of Sullivan. However, their operas were more than great shows – they also influenced our culture, from politics through to advertising. Gilbert & … Read More

Great sporting moments of The British Masters

Samantha PillingEntertainment, Latest News

The British Masters

Originally founded in 1946 and entitled ‘The Dunlop Masters’, The British Masters will be coming to The Grove in Hertfordshire, this year. As we, at the Grim’s Dyke Hotel, are only a short distance away (under ten miles away), we thought we’d celebrate some of the great sporting moments it has seen so far. Great sporting moments of The British Masters The original great … Read More