A brief history of Victorian herbalism

Samantha PillingHistory, The Gardens

herbalism

Herbalism or botanical medicine is one of the oldest traditions around. The Egyptians used herbs for medicine, as did indigenous healers around the world. In Britain, herbalism can be traced back thousands of years. The British Library has a copy of a ‘leech book’ – thought to date back as far as the 800s CE! Medieval lay healers used herbs, … Read More

Traditional picnics – the Victorian way

Samantha PillingFood and Drink, History, The Gardens

Picnics the Vitorian Way

Picnics, the ideal opportunity to meet up with friends and family, enjoy an informal yet tasty meal, whilst having fun in the great outdoors. Wealthy landowners loved a good picnic, as it gave them the chance to sit and enjoy the scenery their estates gave them. However, it was the Victorians who brought picnics to the masses. Their popularity was, … Read More

A Brief History of the Victorian Glasshouse

Samantha PillingHistory, The Gardens

Temperate House

The greenhouse, otherwise known as the Victorian glasshouse, became an iconic feature of british gardens during the Victorian era. As the Victorian’s love of gardening grew, the need to house their fragile, temperature controlled and valuable plants did too. The glasshouse provided a home for these species, whilst also paving the way for plant experimentation and cultivation. A status symbol … Read More

The history of Father’s Day

Samantha PillingHistory

Fathers Day

Father’s Day is an annual celebration that is celebrated in over one hundred countries. This year in the UK, we’ll be celebrating it on Sunday 16th of June. However it wasn’t always a celebrated day. Initially celebrating fatherhood was something only the Copic and Catholic Churches of southern europe celebrated, as part of their St. Joseph’s Day celebrations, but now … Read More

Grim’s Dyke and it’s Outlander connection

Samantha PillingEntertainment, History

hbz-outlander-1535746951

Whether it’s for period dramas or modern soaps, films or popular TV series, Grim’s Dyke has long been used as the perfect backdrop and location. It’s also had an influence on popular TV drama series Outlander – but that connection is not one you may initially think it to be! Author Diana Gabaldon, the writer of the Outlander historical time … Read More

Doctor Who: The Evil of the Daleks

Samantha PillingEntertainment, History

Emperor

Known for being one of the lost episodes of Doctor Who, The Evil of the Daleks was the season finale for series four of the popular TV series. Consisting of 7 episodes, each only 25 minutes long, filming took place during the month of April.The Evil of the Daleks was then broadcast on 20th May 1967 – with the remaining … Read More

The History of Mother’s Day and Mothering Sunday

Samantha PillingHistory

Blog Mother's Day

Every year children around the world show their appreciation for their mothers, by presenting them with cards, flowers and gifts. For the those in the UK, the date for this ‘Mothering Sunday’ changes every year – falling this year, on 31st March 2019. However, for many, this special celebration is frequently referred to as ‘Mother’s Day’ – but they’re actually … Read More

Grim’s Dyke and its fascinating connection to Bletchley Park

Samantha PillingHistory

BLetchley Park

Grim’s Dyke has an expansive history and is one of the most notably active sites in Harrow. Not only does it have a connection that goes back to the first years of the very first century, it’s also an important site of historical interest, due to the Anglo-Saxon earthworks known as Grim’s Ditch, its rich architectural connections to the architect … Read More

Top 10 Gilbert & Sullivan facts

Samantha PillingEntertainment, History

GILBERT & SULLIVAN. Sir Arthur Sullivan (left) and Sir William S

The theatrical partnership of Gilbert & Sullivan produced some of the most memorable comic operas. Although the partnership wasn’t always smooth sailing, it stayed as a form of friendship, right until the end. The partnership also had a massive impact on boosting the career of both men and helped shape the future of musical theatre.  Here are ten top facts … Read More

How the humble Typewriter changed the artistic world

Samantha PillingHistory

Humble Typewriter

In Mark Twain’s autobiography, he claimed to be the first author to submit a typewritten book manuscript for publication. He used a Remington typewriter to type out his manuscripts and, in his autobiography, he states ‘The Adventures of Tom Sawyer’ as being the first typewritten manuscript. The year – 1876. It has since been proven that the first typewritten manuscript … Read More